Sustainable or Regenerative?

May 21, 2018

Sustainable or Regenerative?

These farm buzz words are thrown out in conversations and advertising campaigns. These are tricky terms because they mean different things to different people.  The term sustainable has been so overused in recent years that it seems to be almost meaningless.  Everyone from Walmart and McDonald's to startup companies claim to be sustainable.  Is sustainability really the best idea? 

We need to live with future generations in mind, but the reality is that the small measures being taken in rural and urban areas are not enough.  Ecologists and scientists largely agree that we live in a much more environmentally degraded state than every before.  It is time to start thinking regeneratively instead of trying to sustain or remain the same.  Keeping a degraded landscape the same is not a lofty goal at all! 

On our farm, we seek to regenerate the soil in specific and measurable ways.  How much carbon is being stored, how many species of plants are in our pastures and how do all of our farming practices affect wildlife?  We have seen vast numbers of birds and native plants return to our farm.  These species do not exist in the over sprayed and over tilled fields surrounding us.  We seek to keep topsoil right where it belongs...on our farm, with roots of perennial plants pushing deep into the earth. Our valuable topsoil is our greatest asset and I'm not willing to watch it get washed down the creek and ultimately into Decatur Lake. 

Agriculture is blamed for vast dead zones, contributions to global warming and pollution etc... I could not agree more.  We have seen vast agricultural pollution in our area!  However, let's take a closer look at farming practices and ask the questions about what kind of agriculture contributes to these issues.  Let's take a good hard look at factory farms and chemical-laden mono-cropped fields (corn and beans) that sit with bare soil at least half the year.

I don't mean to get on a soap box, but with all the "green-washing" or corporate marketing trying to look "green" consumers need to dig a little deeper when deciding where to spend their hard earned money.  Visit our farm, ask questions of us and other farmers you buy from.  Consider the impacts of "cheap" food on health, economy and environment.  Positive change happens when conscientious consumers vote with their dollars. 

We are so blessed to be a small part of the lives of our thoughtful customers!  We appreciate your trust and loyalty.  Thank you!

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